Shock finding: More than 75 percent of all ‘honey’ sold in grocery stores contains no honey at all, by definition

This may be a US story, but the same is likely to be true of many of the processed brands in our own supermarkets. 

Worried? Then buy your honey from a source you can trust – your local beekeeper.

Shock finding: More than 75 percent of all ‘honey’ sold in grocery stores contains no honey at all, by definition – Shock finding: More than 75 percent of all ‘honey’ sold in grocery stores contains no honey at all, by definition.

 

Hay fever warning as UK pollen count soars

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/hay-fever-warning-as-uk-pollen-count-soars-across-swathes-of-england-and-wales-9548271.html

I have been inundated with demand from hay fever sufferers for my Seven Kings honey.

Many have found their antihistamines are not working with the current high pollen levels and have turned to local honey to alleviate their symptoms.

Many of them have told me symptoms improve, though some of my other customers have told me they need to start taking honey before the hay fever season for it to be most effective.

If you’re a sufferer, what has been your experience? Post your answers below.

Where do your bees collect nectar and pollen from?

“Where do your bees collect nectar and pollen from?” is a question I’ve been asked a lot recently, and it’s a good question.

Nectar is what bees turn into honey by adding special enzymes to it and reducing the water content. This is their staple food stuff. Pollen is collected as a source of protein to feed young bees.

Honey bees will travel up to three miles to forage on plants, collecting nectar and pollen as they go. It takes the lifetime of 12 bees to make one teaspoon full of honey, so you can see how much work goes into making honey and why it has been prized by man throughout history.

The map below shows a circle with a three-mile radius to give you an idea of the kind of ground my bees will cover to collect honey and pollen. This covers gardens, allotments, parkland, pasture, golf clubs, river banks, railway lines and even a bit of farmland. This means the honey will be a mix of whatever is in greatest supply at the times the bees store it.

As a result, the colour and flavour of the honey can be different at different stages of the season. But I can assure you – it’s all equally delicious.

Map shows a circle of three mile radius. Bees will generally travel up to three miles to forage, which is anywhere in the circle, starting at the centre.

Map shows a circle of three mile radius. Bees will generally travel up to three miles to forage, which is anywhere in the circle, starting at the centre.